Facts and figures

  History

                                                             

In very early times the district was covered with inaccessible forests to which non- Aryan tribes who refused to surrender to the steadily advancing Aryans, retired 

at different times. The entire territory of Chhotanagpur, known as Jharkhand (meaning forest territory) was presumably beyond the pale of district Hindu influence in ancient India. Though out the Turko-Afghan period (up to 1526), the area remained virtually free from external influence. It was only with the accession of Akbar to the throne of Delhi in 1556, 

that Muslim influence penetrated Jharkhand, then known to the Mughals as Kokrah. In 1585, Akbar sent a force under the command of Shahbaj Khan to reduce the Raja of Chotanagpur to the position of a tributary. After the death of Akbar in 1605, the area presumably regained its independence. This necessitated an expedition in 1616 by Ibrahim Khan Fateh Jang, the Governor of Bihar and brother of Queen Noorjehan. Ibrahim Khan defeated and captured Durjan Sal, the 46th Raja of Chotanagpur. He was imprisoned for 12 years but was later released and reinstated on the throne after he had shown his ability in distinguishing a real diamond from a fake one. 

In 1632 Chotanagpur was given as Jagir to the Governor at Patna for an annual payment of Rs. 136000. This was raised to Rs. 161000 in 1636 A.D. During the reign of Muhammad Shah (1719-1748), Sarballand Khan, the Governor of then Bihar, marched against the Raja of Chotanagpur and obtained his submission. Another expedition was led by Fakhruddoula, the Governor of Bihar in 1731.

 He came to terms with the Raja of Chotanagpur. In 1735 Alivardi Khan had some difficulty in enforcing the payment of the annual tribute of Rs. 12000 from the Raja of Ramgarh, as agreed to by the latter according to the terms settled with Fakhruddoula. This situation continued until the occupation of the country by the British. During the Muslim period, the main estates in the district were Ramgarh, Kunda, Chai and Kharagdiha. 

Subsequent to the Kol uprising in 1831 which, however, did not seriously affect Hazaribag, the administrative structure of the territory was changed. The paraganas Ramgarh, Kharagdiha, Kendi and Kunda became parts of the South-West Frontier Agency and were formed into a division named Hazaribag as the administrative headquarters. 

In 1854 the designation of South-West Frontier Agency was changed to Chota Nagpur and it began to be administered as a Non-regulation province under the Lieutenant Governor of the then Bihar. In 1855-56 there was the great uprising of the Santhals against the British but was brutally suppressed.

 After 1991 census, the district of Hazaribag has been divided into three separate districts viz. Hazaribag, Chatra and Koderma. The two sub-divisions namely Chatra and Koderma were upgraded to the status of independent districts.

 

 Geography

                                                           

 

LOCATION AND AREA

Altitude: 611 m
Latitude: 23.5 North to 24.4 North.
Longitude: 85.1 East to 85.9 East.
Area: 11165 sq km.
The district of Hazaribag is situated in the north east part of North Chotanagpur Division. The boundary of this district consists of districts of Gaya and Koderma in the north, Giridih and Bokaro in the east, Ranchi in the south and Palamu and Chatra in the west. Distance of Various places from Hazaribag is given below:

Calcutta (Via-Asonsol-Barhi) 434 kms
Ranchi  91 kms
Dhanbad    128 kms
Gaya  130 kms
Bodh Gaya      118 kms
Patna  235 kms
Daltonganj  198 kms
Koderma   59 kms
Bokaro   113 kms
Jamshedpur  223 kms
Rajgir 145 kms

 

Annual Rainfall          : 1234.5 mm
Temperature             : Max. 42.20 and Min. 4.00 degree Celsius

The district comes within the Tropical Monsoon Regions of the world. Three broad seasons can be recognized:  

            *  The cool season, November to February.

         *  The hot season, March to May.

         *  The rainy season, June to October.  

In general the climate of Hazaribag plateau is much the same as that of Ranchi, differing from the other neighboring districts not only in lower average temperature, but also in the comparative dryness of the air in the rainy season. After the break of the rains in June, the first three months are usually quite pleasant and by the middle of September the mornings offer cold weather. In contrast with Bihar, October is a delightful month. From November to the middle of February the only drawback is the occasional excessive cold which follows rain. If there is a good fall of rain in February it remains cool till the middle of March. From April to May, the day temperature, though high, is always below that of the neighboring districts and it is rare for the nights to be oppressive. The prevailing winds are, during the rains from the south- west, in the cold weather from the west, and in the hot weather from the north-west. The hot weather winds are sometimes dust-laden.  

 

GEOGRAPHY AND PHYSICAL FEATURES

The district forms a part of the Chotanagpur plateau. It is a region of plateaus, residual hills and valleys, which occupy the southern half of the state of Jharkhand. The district may be divided into the following broad natural divisions:

        * The central plateau

        * The lower plateaus, and

        * The Damodar Valley.


The central plateau, averaging 2000 feet high, is situated in the centre of the district and contains the town of Hazaribag. Around the central plateau are the lower plateaus on all sides except the west where a high ridge connects the central plateau to the Palamu district. The lower plateaus average 1300 feet in height, their surface being undulating. In the north and northwest, the lower plateaus form fairly level tablelands until they reach the ghats when they drop to about 700 feet. On the east, the general elevation is lower and the descent gradual. Along the southern part of the district is the Damodar valley in which the town of Ramgarh is situated at a level of 1000 feet lower than Hazaribag.

The chief hills in central Hazaribag are Chandwara and Jillinga which rise above the central plateau to 2816 ands 3057 feet respectively above the mean sea level. To the south of the central plateau lies the Sugu hill which rises to 3203 feet and is separated from the Jillinga by the river Bokaro. Maran Burn hill lies south of the Damodar Valley between Hazaribag and Ranchi districts attaining a height of 3445 feet. Hazaribag is a predominantly forest district and nearly half of the total area is covered by forests which are distributed almost uniformly throughout the district.

 

Demography

 

 

Name of Sub Division

Name of the CD Block

Total Popu

lation

# of GP

# ofReve

nueVillage

% of Total Lite

rates

% of Male Lite

rates

% of Female Lite

rates

% of SC Popul

ation

% of ST Popul

ation

Sadar Subdivisio 

Sadar Hazaribagh

237994

25

95

64.2

59.9

40.0

13.9

4.1

Tatijharia

40253

8

53

 

 

 

 

 

 

Katkamsandi

83525

18

82

44

63.9

36.2

21.6

4.9

Katkamdag

64228

13

48

 

 

 

 

 

Daru

45794

9

52

 

 

 

 

 

Bishnugarh

124175

24

94

33.6

68.0

31.9

12.3

9.7

 

Barkagaon

110958

23

83

39.3

65.9

34.0

17.8

11.8

keredari

 

91241

16

73

35.2

67.1

32.9

20.6

7.5

Ichak

87882

19

83

42.8

63.2

36.8

20.0

2.6

Dadi

71779

14

29

 

 

 

 

 

Churchu

 

44860

8

41

46.9

30.3

16.6

13.9

25.9

Barhi Subdivision 

Padma

43411

8

40

45.6

65.0

35.9

0.18

0.54

Chalkusa

52676

9

45

 

 

 

 

 

Barhi

98779

20

112

40.6

65.9

34.1

17.6

2.6

Chauparan

167246

26

228

38.4

63.7

36.3

24.8

0.8

Barkatha

73192

17

72

29.8

70.6

29.4

 

 

 

Total

Total

1437993

257

  1231